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Pre-order Julie Hanks’ New Book ‘The Burnout Cure’

Pre-order NOW on Amazon.com today!

In stores Aug. 6, 2013

Though it’s only been two years since actually embarking on the actual writing of this book, the ideas, concepts, surveys, and discussions and my desire to write this book started over a decade ago. It’s hard to believe that in a few weeks, I’ll be able to hold an actual book in my hand! I can’t wait to share it with you.

About the book:

If the demands of the day-to-day leave you feeling overworked, overwhelmed, and exhausted, you may be suffering from an all-too-common malady prevalent among Mormon women: emotional burnout. From work in and out of the home to service in wards and communities, the variety of worthy undertakings can seem endless. With such perceived cultural pressure to “do it all,” how can a woman balance the desire to serve others with caring for her own personal needs?

As a wife, mother, clinical counselor, and musician, author Julie de Azevedo Hanks understands better than most the demands placed on women in the Church, and she has spent years providing clinical counseling to LDS women and families. The Burnout Cure dispels common cultural myths that often leave women feeling “never good enough.” Through scriptural quotes, personal stories, and clinical examples, Hanks offers a bevy of tools designed to help sisters identify and meet their emotional needs, to accept their limitations, to let go of the guilt and perfectionism, and to lean on the Lord.

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How To Carve Out You Time: Studio 5

Help for busy, overwhelmed women. Executive director, Julie Hanks answers your questions and offers strategies to help you carve out time for yourself.

1) Include YOU in your circle of care

Self-neglect isn’t a good long-term strategy for self-care. If you are committed to taking care of others for the long haul, then you need to include YOU as one of the people that you nurture and support.

2) Build it in

Set a recurring appointment with yourself and build in the support that you need to make it happen. Get a commitment from your husband for a certain time every week. Hire a teenage neighbor to come every Thursday afternoon for a few hours.

3) Get others on board

Let others have the opportunity to share the care giving responsibilities. If you tend to fall into the role of “caregiver” be sure to invite your family members to participate. If they are unwilling, ask extended family, your church or community group to pitch in.

4) Get creative

If you don’t have resources to hire a babysitter, you may have to get creative. Barter with a neighbor. Swap childcare for making dinner one night a week.

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